Beaver Creek
Burwash Landing
Carcross
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Destruction Bay
Faro
Haines Junction
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Welcome to Mount Lorne
The Hamlet of Mt. Lorne extends from just south of the junction of the Alaska and Klondike Highways to south of Bear Creek, and down the Annie Lake Road to the Wheaton River bridge. It covers an area of 245 square kilometers with a population of 410 people (2011).
Mount Lorne is a rural, residential hamlet named after the prominent landmark for the area Mount Lorne (named after the Right Honourable Sir John Douglas Sutherland Campbell, Marquees of Lorne, Governor General of Canada from 1878- 1883).

Mount Lorne At a Glance

Population
410
Estimated number of residents (2011 Census)
Aboriginal Population
N/A
Total Aboriginal Identity Population (Data for this area has been suppressed for data quality or confidentiality reasons. 2011 National Household Survey)
Language
290
Knowledge of English Language only (2006 Census)
Average Income
N/A
Average income of private household (Data for this area has been suppressed for data quality or confidentiality reasons. 2011 National Household Survey)
Median House Price
N/A
Average value of single-family dwelling (Data for this area has been suppressed for data quality or confidentiality reasons. 2011 National Household Survey)
Median Population Age
27
Population by Age Group (2011 Census)
See More Data on Mount Lorne

Hamlet of Mount Lorne is an unincorporated community represented by an elected local advisory council. The Yukon government is responsible for delivering services to property and residents with input from the council.

Local advisory councils, supported by Yukon Department of Community Affairs, do not have taxing, spending or bylaw-making authority, and are strictly advisory in their role. Elections are held in concert with the regular municipal election cycle of Yukon.

The mandate of the Lorne Mt. Community Association is to provide the facilities and recreational opportunities that promote a healthy lifestyle, encourage family participation, provide opportunities for youth employment and training while supporting goals of sustainability and environmental responsibility.

The Community Centre offers a diversity of programs such as yoga, dances, music concerts, children’s programs, track set ski trails, outdoor ice rink, skate-board park, tennis court, children’s playground and sled-dog races over the winter.

The Mt. Lorne Volunteer Fire Department is a very active organization made up of volunteers of all ages and provides not just fire protection to the hamlet but is also an active participant in many community events.
***

For New Residents

Mount Lorne is a rural, residential hamlet named after the prominent landmark for the area Mount Lorne (named after the Right Honourable Sir John Douglas Sutherland Campbell, Marquees of Lorne, Governor General of Canada from 1878- 1883).

The Hamlet of Mt. Lorne extends from just south of the junction of the Alaska and Klondike Highways to south of Bear Creek, and down the Annie Lake Road to the Wheaton River Bridge. It covers an area of 245 square kilometers with a present population of 410 people.

The Mt. Lorne area has a rich history. First Nations people have a long tradition of hunting and gathering in this region. In 1992, an archaeological dig at Annie Lake discovered remains of campsites dating back over 8000 years.

Easy access to trails in the Watson and Wheaton river valleys has made the area popular to hikers and tales of big snow have made Mt. Lorne a favoured area for mushers training for the Yukon Quest and Iditarod.

An active Local Advisory Council advises on the governance of the Mt. Lorne community.

  • Lorne Mt. Community Association (LMCA) is a registered society formed in 1985 to serve the social and recreational needs of what is now the Hamlet of Mt. Lorne. In 1996, the association was granted the powers of Recreation Authority by the Government of Yukon. LMCA's mandate is to provide the facilities and recreational opportunities that promote a healthy lifestyle, encourage family participation, and provide opportunities for youth employment and training while supporting goals of sustainability and environmental responsibility.

  • The Mt. Lorne Volunteer Fire Department is a very active organization made up of volunteers of all ages and provides not just fire protection to the hamlet but is also an active participant in many community events.

Housing

As of 2011, there were 170 private dwellings, the majority of them single-detached, privately owned homes.

More Information?

Employment

Most Mount Lorne residents work in Whitehorse in private business and government, or are self-employed working from their homes.

For more information: Yukon Socio-Economic Web Portal
Provides census information on Yukon communities

More Information?

  • Yukon Employment Central
    Provides job boards, employment counseling, workshops and more
  • YuWIN
    Online employment resource for employers and job seekers, including current job listings, the Yukon labour market, career planning, education, and training
  • Yukon Workfutures
    Guide to work opportunities in the territory that provides information on the labour market, working conditions, education, and employment prospects
  • Invest Yukon: Yukon Employment Connection
    List of employment-related websites to help your search for employment

For Tourists

Easy access to trails in the Watson and Wheaton river valleys and Mt. Lorne has made the area popular to hikers and tales of big snow have made Mt. Lorne a favoured area for mushers training for the Yukon Quest and Iditarod. White water canoeing is popular on the Wheaton River.

Annie Lake Golf Course, Yukon's first golf course is located 50 km south of Whitehorse at km 2 on Annie Lake Road. Built as a 9 hole course by U.S. Army personnel during the Second World War, it has been a favorite golf venue for over sixty years.

The Lorne Mountain Community Centre (LMCC) maintains and track sets about 12 km of ski trails including 1, 2, 5, 7.5 and 10 km loops and a warm-up loop. We ask that users of these trails become members of the Community Association or pay the $5.00 per day user’s fee. A donation box is located at the trailhead.

The Carbon Hill Sled Dog and Skijor Race is a fun and friendly community-spirited event based out of the Lorne Mtn. Community Centre on the Annie Lake Road. With participants ranging from recreational and rookie mushers to seasoned Quest veterans, The Carbon Hill is developing a reputation as “The biggest little race in Yukon.” The January start date makes Carbon Hill the inaugural race kicking off Yukon’s mushing and skijor season. The range of race classes means there is something for everyone: From the 30 mile mushing and skijor events that wind through the spectacular scenery of the Watson River Valley, to the wild and exciting 200 meter children’s dog-dash.

Amenities
There are several Wilderness Touring companies based in the Hamlet of Mt. Lorne as well as bed and breakfast establishments.

More Information?

For Businesses

Mount Lorne boasts an excellent community centre that offers an inside hall and outside covered pavilion for events, meetings and workshops, and fully stocked kitchen facilities.

The Mount Lorne community offers:

  • An active Local Advisory Council and territorial government
  • Excellent communications and technology infrastructure including cell phone service and high speed internet access in most of the community.

Whitehorse, the Yukon’s capital, is just under an hour’s drive from Mount Lorne and offers a wide variety of business services and amenities, and offers the many benefits of a large capital city.

Mount Lorne Community Association
Provides information on community activities

More Information?

What are the Facts?

Quality of Life

Mount Lorne is a rural community with a close connection to the wilderness areas that surround it. It is a community created out of volunteer efforts. The results of these efforts are the creation of the Hamlet of Mount Lorne, the establishment of the Lorne Mountain Community Association, the Mount Lorne Volunteer Fire Department and one of the best dump and recycling stations in the Yukon.

The Lorne Mountain Community Center hosts a wide variety of events throughout the year catering to all age groups. The events are so popular that they attract many people from outside the Hamlet.

The area surrounding Mount Lorne is noted for its outstanding natural beauty. The rivers, lakes and mountains provide incredible opportunities for many outdoors enthusiasts: hikers, cross country skiers, canoeist and more.

At the same time, the close proximity of the Yukon's capital, Whitehorse, means that the benefits of a city are just a short drive away. Similarly, the coastal community of Skagway, Alaska, is a 2 hour drive south of Mount Lorne across the spectacular White Pass.

More information?

Ecoregion

Geography

Mount Lorne is located in the Yukon Southern Lakes; broad valleys and large lakes characterize this ecoregion. Set within the rain shadow of the Coast Mountains, this ecoregion’s climate is dry and cool. The Yukon Southern Lakes Ecoregion lies in the sporadic discontinuous permafrost zone, where permafrost underlies less than one-quarter of the landscape.

The ecoregion supports the highest diversity of mammals in the Yukon, with at least 50 of the 60 species known to occur in the Yukon at present.

Climate

Mount Lorne is less than 50 kilometers from Whitehorse; while no independent climate information is available for the smaller communities, climate information for Whitehorse gives a fairly good indication of general weather conditions. Localized anomalies in some of the valley areas can occur.

Over the past few decades, the daily temperature in January in Whitehorse reached daytime highs of minus 13 Celsius, dropping to minus 22 Celsius overnight.

 In July the daily temperatures typically reach a high of 20 Celsius and a low at night of about 8 Celsius.

Whitehorse has a relatively dry climate; annual precipitation over several decades averaged close to 270 mm, including 160 to 165 mm of rain and 145 cm of snow.

More Information?

Schools and Training

The majority of school age children take the school bus into Whitehorse each day. There is also an active group of home schooled children in Mount Lorne.

More Information?

First Nations

Mount Lorne is situated in the traditional territories of two first nations:

The Carcross/Tagish First Nation (CTFN), a self-governing First Nation with its administrative centre located in the town of Carcross. The original inhabitants of this area are the Tagish people who belong to the Tagish linguistic grouping of the Athapaskan language family. The First Nation has built its governance structure based on the clan system; six Tlingit Clans are represented in the First Nation with each clan playing a vital role in the governance of the First Nation. Culture is alive and well with CTFN and the community is committed to their culture, to the practice of the Potlatch, and preserving the songs and dances of the clans.

The Kwanlin Dun First Nation is a self-governing First Nation with its administrative centre located in the town of Whitehorse: “We are the Citizens of the Kwanlin Dün First Nation living together in the Traditional Territory of the Kwanlin Dün First Nation. We acknowledge the Tagish Kwan as the original people who live and occupy the lands within the Traditional Territory, which lie at the headwaters of the Yukon River. For many generations, our people have lived along the Chu Nínkwän (today, the Yukon River). Linguistically, the Kwanlin Dün are affiliated with the Southern Tutchone Tribal Council. The Kwanlin Dün include people of Southern Tutchone, Tagish and Tlingit descent. A large part of the Kwanlin Dün citizens live in the Whitehorse area, with the balance dispersed throughout Canada, the U.S. (predominantly Alaska) and abroad.”

Community and Government Services

Whitehorse has more than its share of big-city amenities: cinemas, stores, restaurants and espresso bars, cultural events and public entertainment, indoor arenas and swimming pool, and commuter bus service.

  • Communication 
  • Emergency Services 
  • Employment Services 
  • Healthcare Services 
  • Housing Services
  • Infrastructure
  • Local Government 
  • Local Media 
  • Non-Governmental Services 
  • Parks & Recreation Services 
  • Public Works
  • Religious Organizations and Services 

Health Services

There is no resident medical service within the Hamlet of Mount Lorne. All residents must travel to Whitehorse for health care.

A full range of health care services is available in Whitehorse for all residents:

First Nations Healthcare
The Kwanlin Dun First Nation and Ta'an Kwach'an Council provide a range of social services to their members, from social assistance to elder care.

Pharmacies
List of Whitehorse pharmacies

Social Services
Yukon Health & Social Services and a variety of non-profit organizations provide social services for the community of Whitehorse

HealthLine
Yukon HealthLine 811 is a free, confidential 24-hour service staffed by specially trainees’ registered nurses

Seniors Services
List of Yukon Government services for seniors

Dental and Denture Clinics
Provides list of dental and denture clinics in Whitehorse

Dental Services for Schools
Yukon Children’s Dental Program provides diagnostic, preventative and restorative dental services, for children from newborn to Grade 12.

Hearing Services
Available in Whitehorse

Childcare Services
Provides daycare services for preschool children


Emergency Services

A 911 service is available in Mount Lorne for emergency police, fire, and ambulance responses.

Tell the 911 operator you have a fire or other emergency and need the Mount Lorne Volunteer Fire Department (otherwise you will get the Whitehorse Fire Department and this wastes valuable time).

The 911 operator will activate the paging system and a volunteer will answer and ask the following questions:

  • What is the exact location of your emergency?
  • What is your phone number in case we are disconnected?
  • Where are you calling from?
  • What is your emergency?
  • Is everyone safely out of the structure? (if it is a structure fire)
  • Can you send someone to the end of your driveway so we can find you faster?
  • Get out and stay out - help is on the way.

We hope you never need to use the 911 emergency system. Follow these instructions and help will arrive as quickly as possible.

Ambulance
Primary Care Paramedics (PCP) staff Emergency Medical Services in Whitehorse; available 24 hours/day

Police
Policing provided by an RCMP detachment of one sergeant, one corporal and five constables. 

Fire
City of Whitehorse Fire Department has full and part-time members and undertakes a number of activities, including urban and wildland fire suppression, fire prevention, training, fire safety, inspections, rescue, and building plan review.

Medevac
Available 24 hours for emergencies direct to the most suitable medical facility; crews consist of Critical Care Nurses, Critical Care Paramedics and Advanced Care Paramedics.

Medevac services are available to all people. However, all non-Yukon residents are charged for this services.

Search and Rescue (SAR)
Whitehorse's Search and Rescue (SAR) is ensured by a partnership between the RCMP, Emergency Measures Organization (EMO) and volunteer SAR teams.

Employment Services

Mount Lorne residents must go to Whitehorse for employment services unless they are available on-line.

Yukon Socio-Economic Web Portal
Provides census information on Whitehorse

More Information?

  • Yukon Employment Central
    Provides job boards, employment counseling, workshops and more
  • YuWIN
    Online employment resource for employers and job seekers, including current job listings, the Yukon labour market, career planning, education, and training
  • Yukon Workfutures
    Guide to work opportunities in the territory that provides information on the labour market, working conditions, education, and employment prospects
  • Invest Yukon: Yukon Employment Connection
    List of employment-related websites to help your search for employment

Local Government

The Hamlet of Mount Lorne  is an unincorporated community represented by an elected local advisory council. The Yukon government is responsible for delivering services to property and residents with input from the council.

Local advisory councils, supported by Yukon Department of Community Services, do not have taxing, spending or bylaw-making authority, and are strictly advisory in their role. Elections are held in concert with the regular municipal election cycle of Yukon. The Hamlet of Mount Lorne Advisory Council has been working over the past few years to develop a newsletter the Hamlet of Mount Lorne and Carcross Road area Plan (1995).

Infrastructure

Airports
Mount Lorne is served by the Erik Nielsen Whitehorse International Airport and has scheduled service to Vancouver, Calgary, Edmonton, Dawson City, Old Crow, Inuvik as well as Fairbanks, Alaska and, seasonal service to Frankfurt, Germany.  

Carriers who have regularly scheduled flights into and out of Whitehorse are as follows:

Carriers who have seasonally scheduled charter flights into and out of Whitehorse are as follows:

Numerous small air charter operators and bush pilots use the airport and it serves as a major base for water bombers used in forest firefighting operations and is also a major stopover point for private pilots.  The airport also controls Whitehorse Water Aerodrome, a floatplane base on Schwatka Lake.

Road Access
Access to Mount Lorne is provided by a network of all-paved, all-weather highways, including the international Alaska Highway connecting the Yukon with the Alaska, British Columbia, and Alberta highway networks.  With the exception of Old Crow, every Yukon community can be accessed from Whitehorse by road.

Driving Distances
Distance in kilometers between Yukon communities

Road Report
Provides current road conditions

Yukon Department of Highways and Public Works 
Responsible for ensuring safe and efficient public highways, airstrips, buildings and information systems

Public Works

Mount Lorne is served by the following companies:

Internet
Northwestel is the current internet service provider in Yukon providing high-speed internet connections over phone lines.

Phone
Northwestel offers a full range of services

Cell phone
Bell Mobility and Latitude Wireless are the available cell phone providers with coverage available within Yukon communities but not between Yukon communities

Non-governmental Organizations

Non-Governmental Organization provides useful services to the community.

Lorne Mt. Community Association (LMCA) is a registered society formed in 1985 to serve the social and recreational needs of what is now the Hamlet of Mt. Lorne. In 1996, the association was granted the powers of Recreation Authority by the Government of Yukon. LMCA's mandate is to provide the facilities and recreational opportunities that promote a healthy lifestyle, encourage family participation, provide opportunities for youth employment and training while supporting goals of sustainability and environmental responsibility.

More Information?

Local Media

Print

"What's Up Yukon - your northern guide to events entertainment, arts, culture, sports and recreation and profiles of those who make the fun happen."

Television
Satellite dish


Radio

Magazines

Parks and Recreation

There are no government run parks or campgrounds within the Hamlet of Mount Lorne

Recreation and Facility Services

The Lorne Mountain Community Centre (LMCC) maintains and track sets about 12 km of ski trails including 1, 2, 5, 7.5 and 10 km loops and a warm-up loop. We ask that users of these trails become members of the Community Association or pay the $5.00 per day user’s fee. A donation box is located at the trailhead. At the centre you will also find an outdoor skating rink, Skateboard Park, tennis courts, a children’s playground, disc golf course and outdoor pavilion.

Annie Lake Golf Course, Yukon's first golf course, is located 50 km south of Whitehorse at km 2 on Annie Lake Road. Built as a 9 hole course by U.S. Army personnel during the Second World War, it has been a favourite golf venue for over sixty years.

The Carbon Hill Sled Dog and Skijor Race is a fun and friendly community-spirited event based out of the Mt. Lorne Community Centre on the Annie Lake Road. With participants ranging from recreational and rookie mushers to seasoned Quest veterans, The Carbon Hill is developing a reputation as “The biggest little race in Yukon.” The January start date makes Carbon Hill the inaugural race kicking off Yukon’s mushing and skijor season, and the range of race classes means there is something for everyone: From the 30 mile mushing and skijor events that wind through the spectacular scenery of the Watson River Valley, to the wild and exciting 200 meter children’s dog-dash.

Parks and Trails

The publication “Whitehorse & Area Hikes and Bikes” by the Yukon Conservation Society provides one of best guides to trails in the Mount Lorne area.

More Information?

Many Yukon communities are at the footstep of world class parks:

Yukon Territorial Parks

National Parks

Housing Services

Properties for sale at Mount Lorne, are marketed in our local newspapers.

More Information?

Cost of Living

As with many rural communities, when Mount Lorne residents travel to Whitehorse, less than a 1 hour drive away, they purchase in bulk, or order materials and goods by phone or online, or they supplement their groceries by gardening, hunting, fishing, or baking.

This makes the cost of living in the community only slightly higher than in Whitehorse

More information?

Population and Labour Force

Population

Information on population and community make-up can be found, at the Government of Yukon Socio-Economic web portal.

Labour Force

From forestry to mining, Yukoners have worked in natural resource industries for over 100 years, and in developing expertise for working in remote, cold-climate conditions. 

More recently, with new technologies and media-based innovations, along with territory-wide broadband connectivity, Yukoners have become skilled knowledge-based workers.    

In Whitehorse, the public administration sector remained the territory’s biggest employer in 2011, representing just under a third of the total employees in Yukon.

Economic Activity and Development

Local businesses, private contractors, home-based businesses, wilderness adventure tours, bed & breakfast and trades related work contribute to the economic activity in Mount Lorne.

Improved availability of internet technology also opens up new opportunities for business creation and the opportunity to market the many attributes and local innovations of Mount Lorne worldwide.

Business Services

Mount Lorne boasts an excellent Community Centre that offers an indoor hall as well as an outdoor pavilion for events, meetings and workshops, and fully stocked kitchen facilities.

The Mount Lorne community offers:

  • A supportive Local Advisory Council and territorial government
  • Excellent communications and technology infrastructure including cell phone service and high speed internet access in most of the community

Whitehorse, the Yukon’s capital, is less than an hour’s drive from Mount Lorne, and offers a wide variety of business services and amenities with the many benefits of a large capital city.